​© 2014 all rights reserved by GCG

45 East Putnam Ave Greenwich CT 06830 • Tel 203-489-3556 • info@gclementgallery.com

  • Facebook Clean
  • Twitter Clean
  • Flickr Clean
  • Instagram Clean
  • Instagram App Icon
  • Facebook App Icon
MATT COLAGIURI

 

International artist and photographer was born in Montclair, NJ, in the shadow of New York City. As a student of Yale University, he sang with the renowned a capella singing group and the Whiffenpoofs – an adventure that culminated in a three month world tour. After graduating with a degree he moved into Manhattan to pursue his fist love: theatre. There, he completed his acting training and worked in the city for over a decade. Following this venture Matt decided to rekindle his connection and passion for the arts by returning to school at the Art Institute of Atlanta. Graduating at the top of his class with a degree in Media Arts and Animation his clients at this time included blue-chip companies such as Atlanta Braves and Coca-Cola among others. It was at this period in his career that he decided to pursue his other strong passion: photography. Matt no longer animates, dedicating himself instead to his sculptural

Photography.

 

His work has been exhibited in Paris, London, New York and San Francisco.

“With my Sculptural Photography I aim to take the familiar, deconstruct it, and re-present it in a manner that challenges the

senses. I draw from all the various elements of my background – animation, acting, even the anthropology!- to combat the photographic complacency and engage the viewer in a unique fashion. When the form is not immediately recognisable, the imagery draws you in and invites the viewer to reconsider their preconceptions on the subject matter. With my Pop Art Series, I deliberately try to evoke imagery from the other artist’s work for the first time in my career. I’, hoping the series brings to mind the work of Warhol…plus the style of the pulp magazine print style of the 50’s…as well as remaining true to the voice of my own Sculptural Photography. For me, the gradient of colour represents the impermanence of human emotion – for good or ill”.